Forget Roses – Grow a Cactus

Environment Minister Ian Pearson is set to warn us all this week what we already knew – British summers are getting hotter and drier. Therefore our gardens need to adapt. Instead of thirsty herbaceous borders and other traditional plants we will need to follow the lead of our Mediterranean neighbours and start planting species more suited to the drying conditions.

Environment Minister Ian Pearson is set to warn us all this week what we already knew – British summers are getting hotter and drier. Therefore our gardens need to adapt. Instead of thirsty herbaceous borders and other traditional plants we will need to follow the lead of our Mediterranean neighbours and start planting species more suited to the drying conditions.

Based on research from Kew Gardens, Mr Pearson states:

“The UK’s climate is changing and this is having a big impact on our gardens as well as our natural ecosystems. The growing season for plants is now a month longer than it was 100 years ago, and many of the impacts from climate change will have significant effects on how we manage our gardens in the future.”

It’s thought that some of the more traditional plants will become impossible to grow in the future, especially in the southern counties and gardeners are being advised to let lawns grow longer to increase chances of survival.

All the more reason to start thinking of ingenious ways to store the rain we do get.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*