Ridiculous hosepipe ban rules

Recently widowed Maureen Sanford got a shock on Monday when Three Valleys Water sent her a letter saying she had been reported for filling a watering can with a hose which is banned. However, she is allowed to fill a paddling pool with a hosepipe.

Recently widowed Maureen Sanford got a shock on Monday when Three Valleys Water sent her a letter saying she had been reported for filling a watering can with a hose which is banned. However, she is allowed to fill a paddling pool with a hosepipe.

Confusion seemed to be the order of the day at Three Valleys when Mrs Sanford telephoned them. One person said she was allowed to fill the watering can with a hose and when she phoned back another said she wasn’t.

This is just another example of the mess we are in with banning orders. Surely uniform and sensible rules should be in place across the regions affected by these orders.

Read the full story at Herts & Essex News Online. Discuss Three Valleys Water here.

2 Comments on Ridiculous hosepipe ban rules

  1. A Q&A on Thames Water’s website says you can use a short length of hosepipe to fill containers. This must surely include watering cans?

  2. Hi Rob, thanks for the comment.

    For others reading, Rob’s referring to this page on Thames Water’s website.

    The problem is that Three Valleys have different rules. If you look at their page about using hosepipes they state:

    “Can I use a hosepipe to fill a watering can/water butt to water my garden?
    Having sought further clarification on the legal situation, it is not permitted to use a hosepipe to fill a watering can/water butt with mains water. We would however encourage all of our customers to make use of water butts to collect rainwater which can then be used to water the garden with a watering can or a pump and hosepipe.”

    Which makes me think my original thoughts on the matter were valid: let’s have one set of rules for everyone.

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